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What is PRP?

Regenerative Medicine & Orthobiologics

Platelet rich plasma, or commonly known as PRP, is the plasma portion of your blood. It contains a high platelet concentration. To be labeled as PRP, a platelet count of 4-5 times the baseline should be present in the platelet concentrate.

How does PRP work?

The high concentration of platelets present in PRP contain granules full of proteins and growth factors. The properties of PRP are based on the production and release of these growth factors when the platelets are activated. Platelets begin secreting these proteins and growth factors within 10 minutes of clotting.

How is PRP prepared?

The preparation of PRP includes drawing of blood into a bag or tube. This is followed by centrifugation (spinning the blood) to separate the red cells from the rest of the blood components.  Separation of the platelets from the red cells and the platelet poor plasma leads to the retrieval of PRP.

What conditions can be treated with PRP?

PRP has been used to treat multiple musculoskeletal conditions like tennis elbow, rotator cuff tears, subacromial impingement, osteoarthritis, patellar tendonitis, and achilles tendonitis.

 Who can potentially benefit from PRP?

Considering that there are numerous conditions where PRP is being used, it often becomes difficult to know when you should consider PRP as a treatment option.  It is best to seek the advice of your Orthopedic doctor who will evaluate your specific condition and discuss if PRP therapy would be appropriate for you.

Any other thoughts?

Even with the limited published scientific data, PRP appears to be the most attractive orthobiologic option available. It involves minimal side effects, relative ease of preparation, cost-effectiveness, and the ability to complete the procedure in the office setting.